lucidnee:

People out here liking my selfies like the reblog button not next to the heart.

Y’all fake.

8 hours ago - 1,977 notes © lucidnee


becausebirds:

untyin’ ur shoes, stealin’ ur pans

9 hours ago - 455 notes © becausebirds


Source: becausebirds Via: draneeni

slavocracy:

A Song of Ice and Fire women & Pre-Raphaelite Art (+ associated artists): 

Joan of Arc (1865), John Everett Millais
- Night (1880-85), Edward Robert Hughes
Ophelia (1894), John William Waterhouse
Vanity (1907), Frank Cadogan Cowper
Mary Magdalene (1858-60), Frederick Sandys
The Soul of the Rose (1908), John William Waterhouse
Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysses (1891), John William Waterhouse
- Priestess of Delphi (1891), John Collier
The Beloved (1865), Dante Gabriel Rossetti
The Valykrie’s Vigil (1906), Edward Robert Hughes

9 hours ago - 13,106 notes © slavocracy


Via: slavocracy

the-real-goddamazon:

doublehamburgerjack:

tamikaflynned:

thecarvingwitch:

neverending-fairytale:

Saw my all time favourite dress. Great opportunity to shoot some close-ups!

THIS IS A FUCKING DRAGON DRESS YOU CANNOT CONVINCE ME OTHERWISE

darkersolstice

That was a dragon and they just skinned it

Found my wedding dress.



11 hours ago - 61,849 notes © jamescookjr


Source: jamescookjr Via: mcgwiggles

little things that help ease symptoms of depression:

  • turn the lights on and open a window
  • eat something healthy and drink ice cold water
  • find a comforting album to listen to whenever things get bad
  • take a long, relaxing bath
  • do yourself up in full make up and hair
  • be around people, even if you don’t think it will help
  • watch something funny on netflix
  • wear your favorite/most comfortable outfit
  • immerse yourself in a hobby like drawing
  • lose yourself in a really good book or movie
11 hours ago - 62,196 notes © tempeh-princess


Why the Winter Soldier is Less an Embodiment of Soviet Russia Than I Thought, or: Bucky Barnes, American Cold War Anxieties, and You 

puelhathnofury:

wizzard890:

As you might imagine, I walked into Captain America 2 ready to get my Soviet Russia on. The Winter Soldier run is one of my favorites in—well, in any comic, really, and from what I’d seen in the trailers and whatnot, it looked like we were going to get a heaping dose of what makes that series so special and so sobering: the bloodstained underbelly of Soviet international politics, a glimpse at the way men and women were fed into the meat grinder of the State, pulped for the greater glory of their nation. In Bucky we’d see a drafted soldier kidnapped, brainwashed, and streamlined into the perfect machine. Not an ideal Soviet man, far from it; but a tool, utilitarian and dispassionate, with the five-pointed martial star on his shoulder; the awful triumph of the State over so-called human frailty.

And we did, we got all of that—insofar that you can’t have a Winter Soldier without those things. But as I watched, it became increasingly clear that this movie wasn’t looking to talk about the Soviet Union. There is a reason Bucky only speaks Russian once in the entire film. There’s a reason he’s never addressed in it. There’s a reason his code name is drawn from an investigation into one of the ugliest chapters of American history. And there is a reason that the movie takes this snarling, mechanized, indiscriminate killing machine and explicitly sets him up as Captain America’s other half. 

I’ve seen some reviews going after the film for pulling its punches, of holding up the Greatest Generation as America’s past, and a polluted security branch as its future, absolving it of responsibility for its actions in both cases. It’s HYDRA now and “sacrifices for freedom” then; why aren’t we interrogating ourselves a little harder?

My answer to that is: we did, and the movie is named after what we found.

The Winter Soldier is concerned with security and international supremacy, and the moral compromises America has made (and continues to make) in pursuit of both. It draws a straight line from WWII America to the modern day, where “we did some things we weren’t proud of” becomes drone warfare and Big Brother. Steve is at one end of this timeline, Nick Fury at the other. There’s a chasm of about fifty years between the two points. That’s where the Winter Soldier steps in. 

This film is haunted by an American war, yes. But not the one Steve fought in. The Cold War was “a battle for the soul of mankind”, waged across millions of hearts and minds, and it’s a patched-over burn in the American psyche, barely healed and still tender to the touch. We emerged on the other side of forty-four years as the world’s one and only superpower. And it fucking cost us.

McCarthyism saw Americans turning on one another, fueled by snarling, indiscriminate paranoia. Operation Paperclip recruited Nazi scientists to keep German technology out of Soviet hands. Vietnam, with its thousands dead, was fought to keep the dominoes of Communism from falling across Asia. America, augmented by an unimaginable weapon and ruthlessly militarized, spied, ordered assassinations, irradiated its own children, and dragged the world to the brink of nuclear holocaust. All for the sake of security.  

The Winter Soldier is that America.

Inhuman, bionic, unfeeling, unthinking, the perfect weapon: a creature of progress, powered by pure ideology. The mind wipes? Decades of propaganda in its purest, most undiluted form, administered directly to the brain. The arm? I know a nuclear metaphor when I see one.

If Cap is the potential of America, what we should never stop striving for, the Winter Soldier is what became of us when we fell desperately short. He is what we did to ourselves.

In many ways this film is a ghost story, and like all good ghost stories, it holds up the tragedy of our mistakes and begs us not to repeat them. What SHIELD proposes—Project Insight—is assured destruction, a level of control over a population not exercised since we were staring Russia down over a launch pad. And so the Winter Soldier appears, the long cold shadow of America’s past, and crashes into the hope for its future with the ring of a metal fist against a shield.

Cap can’t destroy him, what’s done is done. Bucky can’t be unwounded, or given back his stolen time; the blood on his hands won’t be scrubbed out. But they can walk slowly together, one helping the other stand. 

Steve can’t progress without Bucky, just as, the film seems to say, America itself is doomed to fester unless it looks to its past and acknowledges what it has done; the things it has ground into dust in the name of a higher cause. In the MCU, the only way Captain America’s country will move forward is if it swears to never, ever go back.

Leave it to Emily to knock this meta out of the park. <3 

11 hours ago - 1,228 notes © wizzard890


the-real-goddamazon:

whitachi:

chris evans - for flaunt magazine

The photoshoot where Chris Evans looks like a truckstop hooker is an important part of manpelt.com

I want to lick stuff off his body what is wrong with me.

11 hours ago - 31,896 notes © jackbarakat


hellotailor:

febricant:


A Softer World 1087

One thousand years of sobbing: an autobiography

i appreciate febricant’s #death would be kinder tag.

hellotailor:

febricant:

A Softer World 1087

One thousand years of sobbing: an autobiography

i appreciate febricant’s #death would be kinder tag.

11 hours ago - 1,597 notes © ir-abelas


Source: ir-abelas Via: okayophelia
haerowyn:

On a major learning curve. Trying a new style and coloring technique. Here is our princess in all her sugary sweet candy glory. A gift to all you pastel addicts &lt;3

haerowyn:

On a major learning curve. Trying a new style and coloring technique. 

Here is our princess in all her sugary sweet candy glory. A gift to all you pastel addicts <3

11 hours ago - 10,599 notes © haerowyn


Source: haerowyn Via: tigermisu